Operations on Regular Languages | Union | Intersection | Concatenation | Kleene Closure | Complement | Power of a String:

1. Union : If L1 and If L2 are two regular languages, their union L1 ∪ L2 will also be regular.

 

For example, L1 = {an | n ≥ 0} and L2 = {bn | n ≥ 0}
L3 = L1 ∪ L2 = {an ∪ bn | n ≥ 0} is also regular.

2. Intersection : If L1 and If L2 are two regular languages, their intersection L1 ∩ L2 will also be regular.

 

For example,
L1= {am bn | n ≥ 0 and m ≥ 0} and L2= {am bn ∪ bn am | n ≥ 0 and m ≥ 0}
L3 = L1 ∩ L2 = {am bn | n ≥ 0 and m ≥ 0} is also regular.

3. Concatenation : If L1 and If L2 are two regular languages, their concatenation L1.L2 will also be regular.

For example,
L1 = {an | n ≥ 0} and L2 = {bn | n ≥ 0}
L3 = L1.L2 = {am . bn | m ≥ 0 and n ≥ 0} is also regular.

4. Kleene Closure : If L1 is a regular language, its Kleene closure L1* will also be regular.

 

For example,
L1 = (a ∪ b)
L1* = (a ∪ b)*
 

5. Complement : If L(G) is regular language, its complement L’(G) will also be regular. Complement of a language can be found by subtracting strings which are in L(G) from all possible strings.

 

For example,
L(G) = {an | n > 3}
L’(G) = {an | n <= 3}

Note : 

Two regular expressions are equivalent if languages generated by them are same. For example, (a+b*)* and (a+b)* generate same language. Every string which is generated by (a+b*)* is also generated by (a+b)* and vice versa.

 

Power of a String:

Consider ∑ = {0, 1}. The following are the power of an alphabet over input alphabet ∑.

(L)∑ = {null}: zero length string

(L)∑ = {0, 1}: set of 1 length string

(L)∑ = {01, 10, 11}: set of 2 length string

Contributor's Info

Created: Edited:
0Comment
Theory of Computation : Basic Terms | Power of an alphabet: | Algebraic Structure | Set of a String

Theory of Computation is a branch of computer science that deals with designing abstract self-propelled computing devices that follow a predetermined sequence of operations automatically.

                                      Theory of Computation – Basic Terms:

Symbols:

  • Theory of computation is entirely based on symbols. These symbols are generally letters and digits.

Example: 0, 1 are symbols of binary digits

    A, B, C, …., Z is symbols of letter alphabet.

 

Alphabet:

  • An alphabet is any finite set of symbols.

Example − ∑ = {a, b, c, d} is an alphabet set where ‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, and‘d’   are symbols.

         ∑ = {0, 1} is an alphabet of binary digits set where ‘0’, ‘1’ are symbols.

  • To represent alphabet in automata we use Σ (sigma symbol).
  • Now there is a rule for checking the validation of alphabets on the basis of which we declare a set of symbols or a symbol valid or invalid.

Rule: 

If we have used any alphabet then it should not be prefix in the next combination or alphabet.

Σ = {a, b}         Valid

Σ = {a, ba, c}    Valid

Σ = {a, ab, c}    Invalid

Σ = {0, 10}    Valid

Σ = {1, 10, 11}    Invalid

 

Power of an alphabet:

Consider ∑ = {a, b}. The following are the power of an alphabet over input alphabet ∑.

∑ = {null}: zero length string

∑ = {a, b}: set of 1 length string

∑ = {aa, ab}: set of 2 length string

 

Algebraic Structure

A non empty set S is called an algebraic structure with respect to binary operation if (a*b) belongs to S for all (a*b) belongs to S, i.e (*) is closure operation on ‘S’.

Ex : S = {1,-1} is algebraic structure under *

As 1*1 = 1, 1*-1 = -1, -1*-1 = 1 all results belongs to S.

But above is not algebraic structure under + as 1+ (-1) = 0 not belongs to S.

 

String

String is a finite sequence of symbols taken from ∑.

Ex :  ‘ cabcad ’ is a valid string on the alphabet set ∑ = {a, b, c, d}

 

Set of a String :

  • Definition – The set of strings, including the empty string, over an alphabet ∑ is denoted by ∑*.
  • Examples − For ∑ = {0, 1} we have set of strings as ∑* = {є, 0, 1, 01, 10, 00, 11, 10101,…}.
    and ∑1 = {0, 1} , ∑2 = {00, 01, 10, 11} and so on.

∑* contains an empty string є. The set of non- empty string is denoted by ∑+.

 

Contributor's Info

Created:
0Comment